Religion News Service wrote about a $1.5 million grant to benefit the teaching of science in seminaries. Catholic University was among the recipients. America also published an article about the grants. See below.

Seminaries awarded $1.5 million to include science in coursework

From: Religion News Service Date: Oct. 8, 2014 Author: Sarah Pulliam Bailey

Responding to a real or perceived gap between science and faith, 10 U.S. seminaries will receive a combined $1.5 million in grants to include science in their curricula, the American Association for the Advancement of Science announced Wednesday (Oct. 8).

A diverse set of Christian seminaries will be awarded grants ranging from $90,000 to $200,000 provided by the John Templeton Foundation, which has funded various efforts to bridge science and faith, including $3.75 million to AAAS for the project.

"Many (religious leaders) don't get a lot of science in their training and yet they become the authority figures that many people in society look up to for advice for all kinds of things, including issues related to science and technology," said Jennifer Wiseman, director of the AAAS Dialogue on Science, Ethics and Religion.

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Science for Seminaries Project To Bring Science and Religion Together

From: America Date: Oct. 9, 2014 Author: Mary Ann Walsh

The theology schools at The Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C., and the Jesuit-run Santa Clara University in California are among 10 Christian theology schools awarded grants to integrate studies in hard sciences into their theological curricula.

The grants, called "Science for Seminaries," were announced Oct. 9 by the American Association for the Advancement of Science and supported by funds from the John Templeton Foundation.

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According to C.U.A. materials, "the CUA School of theology and Religious Studies will develop science content to be incorporated into its master of divinity curriculum.

"The intention is to create a scientific conversation across a broad set of courses, both core curriculum and electives that will help develop seminarians who can address scientific questions and issues as they begin their pastoral ministry."

The project's lead faculty, Msgr. Kevin Irwin and Professors David Bosworth and Robert Miller also "will serve as coaches to other faculty as part of a school-based Science in the Curriculum team, with the responsibility of creating an environment in the school where science topics are explored and pedagogical opportunities are realized," C.U.A. said.

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